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TritonWear Race Analysis – 2016 Olympic Games Women’s 100m Backstroke

Image of Matt Swanston
Matt Swanston

Race Analysis

It was a tight race across the board – almost all the swimmers were equalling the world record line coming into the turn, with Emily Seebohm leading the pack half a second under world record pace. In the final stretch both the gold medal and bronze seemed up for grabs, but Katinka Hosszu of Hungary pulled ahead of Kathleen Baker of the United States in the final ten meters to touch in 58.45 and 58.75 respectively. Kylie Masse of Canada tied Fu Yuanhui of China for the bronze in 58.76 seconds.

See the results, along with the complete metrics of the women's 100m backstroke here.

Takeaways for you training

Though she attacked her swim and looked strong for the majority of the race, Seebohm was unable to hold her stroke rate on the final 50 and fell back to seventh place. While Baker had a quick turn and powered into the lead on the second half of the race, Hosszu managed to maintain incredible efficiency to pass her in the final stretch. The touch at the wall made the difference for Masse as she nailed the finish to catch up to Fu, who took an extra stroke. This race showed how crucial the final drive to the wall is in determining results.

Check out our analysis of another race from the 2016 Rio Olympics: Men's 200 IM

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